Our vision:

To create natural, simple yet effective skincare for every man.
At Native Man, we pride ourselves with the extensive research and studies that the team has put into our product formulation.

The entire product formulation stage took 2 years to finalise. Through this process, we discovered some of the most powerful native Australian plants that are more effect than many commonly used synthetic chemical ingredients in skincare.


Ingredient 1: Kakadu Plum

This native Australian fruit is most commonly found in Northwest Australia, and has been found to contain the highest vitamin C concentration compared to any other natural source in the world.

Vitamin C is crucial in skin cell regeneration, as well as providing antioxidant properties for delaying skin ageing effects.

Konczak, Izabela; Zabaras, Dimitrios. Antioxidant capacity and hydrophilic phytochemicals in commercially grown native Australian fruits. Food Chemistry. 2010; 123(4):1048-1054.

Also has the highest phenolic concentration, which directly related to its strength of anti-oxidant power, preventing from cellular damage.

Konczak, Izabela; Zabaras, Dimitrios. Antioxidant capacity and hydrophilic phytochemicals in commercially grown native Australian fruits. Food Chemistry. 2010; 123(4):1048-1054.

Ingredient 2: Lemon Myrtle

Lemon Myrtle, most commonly found in Southeast Queensland, is claimed as the “Queen of the lemon herbs", due to it's high concentration of citral.

Citral is a measure of their antimicrobial activity, and is also a precursor in the production of Vitamin A. This helps to reduce acne, blackheads, and helps with skin cell regeneration.

Jenny M. Wilkinson et al. (2002) Bioactivity of Backhousia citriodora (Lemon Myrtle): Antibacterial and antifungal activity Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. Vol 51; Issue 1: Page 76-81.

Studies confirmed the Australian Aboriginal usage of Lemon Myrtle as an antiseptic agent and confirms it medicinal potential.

Cock, I. (2013). Antimicrobial activity of Backhousia citriodora (lemon myrtle) methanolic extracts. Pharmacognosy Communications, 3(2), 58–63.